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Impressionism

The Hasso Plattner Collection
#ImpressionismusBarberini
 Claude Monet:  Argenteuil, Late Afternoon,  1872
 Claude Monet:  Argenteuil, Late Afternoon,  1872
Reflections in the River
First chapter
 Gustave Caillebotte:  The Argenteuil Bridge and the Seine,  ca. 1883

Gustave Caillebotte: The Argenteuil Bridge and the Seine, ca. 1883

Gustave Caillebotte: The Argenteuil Bridge and the Seine, ca. 1883
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The painter who ‘divides’ color does not subject himself to the tedious task of daubing his canvas with multicolored dots. He proceeds from the contrast of two tones—he opposes his individual elements on either side of the dividing line and balances them—until another contrast becomes for him the motif of a new combination.

Paul Signac 
 Paul Signac:  Clipper,  1887

Paul Signac: Clipper, 1887

 Maurice de Vlaminck:  Banks of the Seine at Bougival,  1906

Maurice de Vlaminck: Banks of the Seine at Bougival, 1906

©
 Camille Pissarro:  Boulevard Montmartre, Twilight,  1897
 Camille Pissarro:  Boulevard Montmartre, Twilight,  1897
Paris and the Periphery
Second chapter
 Gustave Caillebotte:  Rue Halévy, View from a Balcony,  1877

Gustave Caillebotte: Rue Halévy, View from a Balcony, 1877

 Gustave Caillebotte:  Rue Halévy, View from the Sixth Floor,  1878

Gustave Caillebotte: Rue Halévy, View from the Sixth Floor, 1878

Gustave Caillebotte: Rue Halévy, View from the Sixth Floor, 1878
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 Gustave Caillebotte:  Couple on a Walk,  1881

Gustave Caillebotte: Couple on a Walk, 1881

Gustave Caillebotte: Couple on a Walk, 1881
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 Claude Monet:  Poplars at Giverny,  1887
 Claude Monet:  Poplars at Giverny,  1887
A New Kind of Realism
Third chapter
 Pierre-Auguste Renoir:  Path in the Forest,  1874–1877

Pierre-Auguste Renoir: Path in the Forest, 1874–1877

 Camille Pissarro:  Hoar-Frost, Peasant Girl Making a Fire,  1888

Camille Pissarro: Hoar-Frost, Peasant Girl Making a Fire, 1888

 Claude Monet:  Grainstacks,  1890

Claude Monet: Grainstacks, 1890

For me, a landscape does not exist in its own right, since its appearance changes at every moment; but the surrounding atmosphere brings it to life—the air and the light, which vary continuously. . . . For me, it is only the surrounding atmosphere which gives subjects their true value.

Claude Monet
 Eugène Boudin:  Le Havre: The Outer Harbor at Sunset,  1882
 Eugène Boudin:  Le Havre: The Outer Harbor at Sunset,  1882
Modernity by the Sea
Fourth chapter

Everything that is painted directly and on the spot has always a strength, a power, a vivacity of touch which one cannot recover in the studio.

Eugène Boudin
 Claude Monet:  The Port of Le Havre, Night Effect,  1872

Claude Monet: The Port of Le Havre, Night Effect, 1872

Claude Monet: The Port of Le Havre, Night Effect, 1872
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 Berthe Morisot:  The Thames,  1875

Berthe Morisot: The Thames, 1875

The Thames is truly beautiful. I often think of how much you would enjoy the glimpse of the dome of St. Paul’s through the forest of yellow masts, the whole thing bathed in a golden haze.

Berthe Morisot to her sister Edma
 Camille Pissarro:  Garden and Henhouse at Octave Mirbeau's, Les Damps,  1892
 Camille Pissarro:  Garden and Henhouse at Octave Mirbeau's, Les Damps,  1892
Artist Gardens
Fifth chapter
 Claude Monet:  The Water-Lily Pond,  ca. 1918

Claude Monet: The Water-Lily Pond, ca. 1918

Claude Monet: The Water-Lily Pond, ca. 1918
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It took me some time to understand my water lilies. I planted them purely for pleasure; I grew them with no thought of painting them. A landscape takes more than a day to get under your skin. And then, all at once I had the revelation—how wonderful my pond was—and reached for my palette. I’ve hardly had any other subject since that moment.

Claude Monet
 Henri Le Sidaner:  Window with Carnations, Gerberoy,  1908

Henri Le Sidaner: Window with Carnations, Gerberoy, 1908

Henri Le Sidaner: Window with Carnations, Gerberoy, 1908
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 Camille Pissarro:  View of Bazincourt, Snow Effect, Sunset,  1892
 Camille Pissarro:  View of Bazincourt, Snow Effect, Sunset,  1892
The Color White
Sixth chapter
 Claude Monet:  Floes at Bennecourt,  1893

Claude Monet: Floes at Bennecourt, 1893

 Alfred Sisley:  Snow Effect in Louveciennes,  1874

Alfred Sisley: Snow Effect in Louveciennes, 1874

Alfred Sisley: Snow Effect in Louveciennes, 1874
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Objects should be painted … bathed in light just as they are in nature. … The sky must be the means of doing so (the sky cannot be a mere background)…. It reminds us of the movement of waves on the ocean, inspires us, and carries us away … I always start a painting with the sky.

Alfred Sisley
 Henri-Edmond Cross:  The Beach at Saint-Clair,  1896
 Henri-Edmond Cross:  The Beach at Saint-Clair,  1896
The Coasts of Europe
Seventh chapter
 Claude Monet:  Strada Romana at Bordighera,  1884

Claude Monet: Strada Romana at Bordighera, 1884

 Claude Monet:  Villas at Bordighera,  1884

Claude Monet: Villas at Bordighera, 1884

Claude Monet: Strada Romana at Bordighera, 1884
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 Paul Signac:  The Port at Sunset, Opus 236 (Saint-Tropez),  1892

Paul Signac: The Port at Sunset, Opus 236 (Saint-Tropez), 1892

Paul Signac: The Port at Sunset, Opus 236 (Saint-Tropez), 1892
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By the elimination of all muddy colors, by the exclusive use of the optical mixture of pure colors, by a methodical divisionism and a strict observation of the scientific theory of colors, Neo-Impressionism insures a maximum of luminosity, of color intensity, and of harmony—a result that has never yet been obtained.

Paul Signac
 Auguste Herbin:  Landscape on Corsica,  1907
 Auguste Herbin:  Landscape on Corsica,  1907
Landscapes of the Fauves
Eighth chapter
 André Derain:  Landscape near Cassis,  1907/08

André Derain: Landscape near Cassis, 1907/08

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 Maurice de Vlaminck:  The Forest,  1914–18

Maurice de Vlaminck: The Forest, 1914–18

©
Maurice de Vlaminck: The Forest, 1914–18
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